I’m pleased to present my seventh annual list of the past year’s ten most significant business divorce cases. This year’s crop includes noteworthy rulings on a variety of issues in dissolution, appraisal, books-and-records, and other cases involving closely held corporations and limited liability companies. All ten were featured on this blog previously; click on the case name to read the full treatment. And the winners are:

  1. Zacharius v Kensington Publishing Corp., 42 Misc 3d 1208, 2014 NY Slip Op 50011(U) [Sup Ct, NY County Jan. 6, 2014], a lawsuit involving a family-owned publishing business in which Justice Eileen Bransten upheld a stock voting agreement that gave board control to the minority shareholders/step-children of the majority shareholder, although she allowed the majority owner’s suit to proceed on a claim challenging the authenticity of her late husband’s signature on the voting agreement.
  2. Pokoik v Pokoik, 115 AD3d 428, 2014 NY Slip Op 01502 [1st Dept Mar. 6, 2014], a first impression ruling in which the Appellate Division, First Department, in granting summary judgment against an LLC manager for breach of fiduciary duty, rejected the manager’s reliance on the safe-harbor provisions of LLC Law § 409.
  3. Mintz v Pazer, Decision and Order, Index No. 502127/13 [Sup Ct, Kings County Mar. 12, 2014], in which Justice David Schmidt enforced an unusual, “quick draw” buy-sell provision in the shareholders’ agreement of a real estate holding company owned 50/50 by two families, compelling a sale to the family that gave the first notice of purchase following unsuccessful mediation of a deadlock.
  4. JPS Partners v Binn, 2014 NY Slip Op 31204 [Sup Ct, NY County May 6, 2014], in which Justice Melvin Schweitzer held that the restructuring of an LLC, in which substantially all of its assets were transferred to a subsidiary, unintentionally triggered the LLC’s dissolution under a provision in the operating agreement.
  5. Budis v Skoutelas, Short Form Order, Index No. 702060/13 [Sup Ct, Queens County July 16, 2014], in which Justice Orin Kitzes held that the estate of a deceased LLC member had no standing to assert derivative claims on the LLC’s behalf.
  6. Retirement Plan for General Employees v McGraw-Hill Cos., 120 AD3d 1052, 2014 NY Slip Op 06154 [1st Dept Sept. 11, 2014], in which the Appellate Division, First Department, reversed the trial court’s ruling dismissing a books-and-records proceeding brought against McGraw-Hill, and held that the petitioning pension fund’s stated purpose of the requested inspection, to investigate the board’s oversight of McGraw-Hill’s subsidiary, Standard & Poor’s, was a proper purpose even if the inspection ultimately establishes that the board engaged in no wrongdoing.
  7. Zelouf International Corp. v Zelouf, 45 Misc 3d 1205(A), 2014 NY Slip Op 51462(U) [Sup Ct, NY County Oct. 6, 2014] [click here for Part 2], a post-trial ruling in a dissenting shareholder appraisal case in which, among other significant rulings, Justice Shirley Kornreich rejected a discount for lack of marketability and granted the petitioner a separate award on her quasi-derivative claims against the controlling shareholders.
  8. Ferolito v AriZona Beverages USA, LLC, 2014 NY Slip Op 32830(U) [Sup Ct, Nassau County Oct. 14, 2014], in which Justice Timothy Driscoll awarded close to $1 billion (that’s not a typo) to the 50% owner of the AriZona Iced Tea business in a fair value buy-out proceeding under BCL § 1118. The court’s many significant rulings included its sole reliance on the DCF method and its rejection of potential acquirers’ expressions of interest.
  9. Cortes v 3A N. Park Ave. Rest Corp., 2014 NY Slip Op 24329 [Sup Ct, Kings County Oct. 28, 2014], in which Justice Carolyn Demarest conditionally ordered the dissolution of a restaurant business from which the controlling shareholders were found to have skimmed about $3.7 million cash, unless they purchased the minority owner’s shares for about $1.2 million.
  10. Slayton v Highline Stages, LLC, 2014 NY Slip Op 24333 [Sup Ct, NY County Oct. 30, 2014], in which Justice Shirley Kornreich ruled that LLC Law § 407’s default rule, permitting members to act by written consents without a meeting, trumped the meeting requirement in LLC Law § 1002(c) governing member approval of mergers.

Two of the above cases — Ferolito and Zelouf — also made it onto the nationwide top-ten list published in the January 2015 issue of Business Valuation Update, the business valuation profession’s leading monthly newsletter.

  • Thomas D. Kearns

    Peter, you missed a good one. First Department decision in Kafa investments v 2170-2178 Broadway LLC. Do you agree that it Effectively overrules Blue Chip?

    • pmahler

      Tom, I’d say the Court of Appeals’ decision in the Centro case, which Kafa cited, effectively overruled Blue Chip. Here’s the pertinent excerpt from Centro:

      “A sophisticated principal is able to release its fiduciary from claims — at least where, as here, the fiduciary relationship is no longer one of unquestioning trust — so long as the principal understands that the fiduciary is acting in its own interest and the release is knowingly entered into (see Alleghany Corp., 333 F2d at 333 [“There is no prerequisite to the settlement of a fraud case that the (fiduciary) defendant must come forward and confess to all his wrongful acts in connection with the subject matter”]; Consorcio Prodipe, S.A. de C.V., 544 F Supp 2d at 191). To the extent that Appellate Division decisions such as Littman v Magee (54 AD3d 14, 17 [1st Dept 2008], Blue Chip Emerald v Allied Partners Inc. (299 AD2d 278, 279-280 [1st Dept 2002]), and Collections v Kolber, 256 AD2d 240, 241 [1st Dept 1998]) suggest otherwise, they misapprehend our case law.”

      • Thomas D. Kearns

        I have always agreed that Centro questioned the continuing validity of Blue Chip but some, including the First Dept in Pappas, didn’t seem to agree. After Pappas was reversed, the First Dept now seems to accept it. Note there was no history of partner discord in Kafa. Always enjoy your blog ! Happy new year.