When a minority shareholder petitions for judicial dissolution under § 1104-a of the Business Corporation Law based on the majority’s alleged oppressive conduct, looting, waste, or diversion of corporate assets, BCL § 1118 kicks in, granting the corporation and the other shareholders the right to halt the dissolution proceeding and to convert it to a stock appraisal proceeding, by electing to purchase the petitioner’s shares for “fair value” determined as of the day before the date on which the petition was filed.

New York’s highest court, in Matter of Pace Photographers, Ltd., described § 1118’s election to purchase as “a defensive mechanism [to § 1104-a] for the other shareholders and the corporation, giving them an absolute right to avoid the dissolution proceedings and any possibility of the company’s liquidation” while, at the same time, “the minority is protected by a court-approved determination of fair value and other terms and conditions of the purchase.”

How is the election exercised? Who can exercise it? Can it be exercised conditionally? When can it be exercised? Once exercised, can it be revoked? Read on for the answers. Continue Reading A Deep Dive Into the Election to Purchase in Dissolution Proceedings

door“Marriage is tough, business relationships may be tougher.”

Wise words from someone who should know — Nassau County Supreme Court Justice Timothy S. Driscoll, who presided over matrimonial cases before joining the Commercial Division where he has adjudicated some of the thorniest business divorce cases such as the AriZona Iced Tea donnybrook.

The quoted words appear in an oral argument transcript in a case called Cardino v Feldman pending before Justice Driscoll involving a fight between 50-50 owners of a construction company operated by the defendant Feldman. It’s a factually and procedurally complex matter, the details of which I’ll spare readers in favor of focusing on the main takeaway from Justice Driscoll’s recent decision in the case, namely, that once a business owner asserts a claim for judicial dissolution under Section 1104-a of the Business Corporation Law — even if not pleaded in strict accordance with the statute — it’s very difficult to reverse course after the other shareholder timely elects to purchase the petitioner’s shares for fair value under BCL Section 1118. Continue Reading Once Opened, The Door to Judicial Dissolution and Buy-Out Is Hard to Close

pushLong Island’s dense population and surfeit of privately owned businesses small, medium, and large assure the Commercial Division judges of the Nassau County Supreme Court more than their fair share of disputes between business co-owners. What’s amazing is the range of business divorce cases heard by that court, from AriZona Iced Tea involving a multi-billion dollar, internationally known brand to the smallest mom-and-pop shops where you wonder how the fight can be worth the legal bills.

One thing in common between the high-stakes AriZona Iced Tea case and, on the other end of the spectrum, the pending fight between two co-owners of the Gusto Latino Bar & Restaurant, a neighborhood watering hole located in Hempstead, New York, is that both cases took about five years to resolve. There the similarity ends. And, again, you have to wonder how the Gusto Latino case, in which the invested dollar amounts cited in the court’s decision wouldn’t even qualify as a rounding error in the AriZona Iced Tea case, possibly has justified five years of litigation expense.

So why am I writing about it? Not because there’s anything particularly compelling about its facts or the parties’ claims. Essentially it’s a garden variety case where parties go into business together without a shareholders’ agreement after which there’s a falling out and one side claims the other either is not a shareholder or, at most, holds a minority interest. We’ve all seen dozens of similar cases.

Rather, the Gusto Latino case is noteworthy because of the novel remedy devised by the presiding judge. For those who read this blog regularly, you’ve already guessed correctly that when I mention a novel remedy in a Nassau County Commercial Division business divorce case, chances are I’m referring to a decision by that court’s senior member, Justice Stephen A. Bucaria, who, as I’ve noted before, is not afraid to think outside the box when it comes to creative solutions to intractable shareholder disputes. Continue Reading First a Judicial Nudge, Then a Push to the Buy-Out in Shareholder Dispute

I’ve often said that business owners don’t fight over corpses, meaning that no one in their right mind would incur the trouble and expense of bringing or contesting a judicial dissolution petition over a business that has no value.

Well, like most generalities, there are exceptions. Seven years ago, among this blog’s inaugural posts, I wrote about a Manhattan Supreme Court case called Matter of Giraud in which an allegedly oppressed minority shareholder petitioned under BCL § 1104-a for judicial dissolution of an art consignment business, the majority shareholder elected to buy him out under BCL § 1118, the majority shareholder’s unopposed appraisal expert testified that the indebted, money-losing business with a short remaining term on its lease had no positive value, and the court ordered the majority shareholder to tender a symbolic $1 to acquire the petitioner’s shares.

Now there’s another one. Earlier this month, in Matter of Markowitz, 2014 NY Slip Op 51739(U) [Sup Ct, Kings County Dec. 10, 2014], Brooklyn Commercial Division Presiding Justice Carolyn E. Demarest, citing the Giraud case, ordered the two respondent shareholders, who had elected to purchase the shares of the two petitioning shareholders, to pay the nominal sum of $1 to each of them. Easing the pain somewhat, Justice Demarest also ordered the purchasing shareholders to provide releases and an indemnification and hold harmless personal guarantee against any claims made against the petitioners relating to the business.   Continue Reading Dissolution Battle Over Heavily Indebted Business Yields $1 Buy-Outs