Serving as the tiebreaker on a equally divided board of directors can be a thankless task, which puts it mildly when one faction sues to remove the tiebreaker. This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights a noteworthy case in which a 50% member of a Delaware LLC claimed the right to unilaterally remove the designated tiebreaker.
Continue Reading It Takes Two to Remove a Tiebreaker

Can a shotgun turn into a minefield? The answer is “yes” judging from a recent decision by Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Andrew Borrok finding a defective exercise of provisions in an LLC agreement for a deadlock-triggered shotgun buy-out. Read about it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading LLC Member Pays the Price For Not Sticking to Deadlock-Breaking Script

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we consider a remarkably thoughtful opinion by Commercial Division Justice Jennifer G. Schecter containing some noteworthy hints about the future of LLC dissolution claims in light of the coronavirus pandemic and its catastrophic economic impact on New York closely-held businesses.
Continue Reading Will the Pandemic Be a Boon for Future LLC Dissolution Claimants?

Under what circumstances, if at all, does resignation of one member of a two-member board of directors eliminate “deadlock” and “internal dissention” as an available grounds for corporate judicial dissolution? In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we consider a recent ruling by Justice Andrea Masley on that important question.
Continue Reading Resignation: Antidote for Internal Dissention and Deadlock?

Can a 49% shareholder who has co-equal control rights per the shareholders agreement bring an action for deadlock dissolution? Get the answer in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading 49% Shareholder Can’t Seek Deadlock Dissolution Despite Shareholders’ Agreement Granting Co-Equal Control