Suffolk Anesthesiology

The cringe-worthy phrase, “legal equivalent of a proctology exam,” gained notoriety about ten years ago when its use by an attorney in a pre-litigation demand letter was cited by a federal judge as partial justification for a $50,000 sanction award which was later reversed on appeal. The phrase involuntarily leapt to mind when I read the recent post-trial decision by Suffolk County Commercial Division Justice Emily Pines in Suffolk Anesthesiology Associates, P.C. v. Verdone, 2012 NY Slip Op 50728(U) (Sup Ct Suffolk County Apr. 25, 2012), a bare-knuckles contest pitting an expelled physician-shareholder of a large Long Island anesthesiology practice against the 11 other physician-shareholders.

The parties’ very public charges and counter-charges of improper financial dealings, conflicts of interest and potentially serious healthcare law violations, none of which ultimately swung the case outcome, if nothing else offer a compelling argument for inclusion of a binding arbitration clause in the shareholder and employment agreements, thereby ensuring that the airing of the practice’s allegedly “dirty linen” will be confined to a private, confidential setting.

The Verdone case also offers healthcare transactional attorneys a cautionary lesson on drafting mandatory buyback provisions triggered by a shareholder’s departure from the practice, to avoid a draining battle as took place in Verdone over whether the expelled shareholder was terminated with or without cause.

Continue Reading Anesthesiology Practice Undergoes “Legal Equivalent of a Proctology Exam” in Shareholder Dispute