“Is she or isn’t she a shareholder? Only her tax preparer knows for sure.” It may not be quite as catchy as the famous Clairol commercial, but it’s a good entreaty to read this week’s New York Business Divorce highlighting a recent appellate ruling in a dissolution case in which the petitioner unsuccessfully relied on tax returns to prove his shareholder status.
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Earlier this month, in a case called Reichman v. Reichman, the Brooklyn-based Appellate Division, Second Department, reversed a lower court’s decision and granted a preliminary injunction in a bitter feud between father and son over the ownership of a dot-com business organized as an LLC. Don’t miss it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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Tax analysis is a critical part of the business divorce attorney’s job when it comes to fashioning a shareholder buy-out agreement that, among other things, protects the selling shareholder from personal income tax liability on non-distributed or “phantom” net income that later may show up on the shareholder’s Schedule K-1. This week’s New York Business Divorce looks at a recent decision by Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Judith Gische in a fight over the tax consequences of a buy-out settlement of a corporate dissolution.

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