In this week’s New York Business Divorce, read about a recent appeals court decision in which an elderly male business founder alleged he was ousted from the company and his reputation smeared based upon false allegations of sexual harassment allegedly solicited by a hostile male CEO. Do these allegations equate to a viable claim for breach of fiduciary duty against the CEO? Find out in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading #MeToo and Business Divorce: The Flip Side

The Delaware Chancery Court finally caught up with court decisions in New York and elsewhere, ruling last month in a case involving a bitcoin mining company that Delaware courts lack subject matter jurisdiction to adjudicate petitions to dissolve non-Delaware business entities. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Delaware Declines Subject Matter Jurisdiction Over Judicial Dissolution of Foreign Entities

If man’s first sin was eating the apple, a business valuator’s greatest sin is mixing apples and oranges. In Dieckman v. Regency GP, LP, Chancellor Bouchard denied the Plaintiff’s bid for $1.6 billion in damages, even after finding that the defendant general partner breached the partnership agreement’s implied duty of good faith and fair dealing.  The decision rests on Chancellor Bouchard’s complete rejection of Plaintiff’s damages calculation on the grounds that it was akin to “comparing apples to oranges.”
Continue Reading General Partner Breached Implied Covenants in Partnership Agreement, but Plaintiff’s “Apples-to-Oranges” Calculation Dooms Bid for Damages

Serving as the tiebreaker on a equally divided board of directors can be a thankless task, which puts it mildly when one faction sues to remove the tiebreaker. This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights a noteworthy case in which a 50% member of a Delaware LLC claimed the right to unilaterally remove the designated tiebreaker.
Continue Reading It Takes Two to Remove a Tiebreaker

Can an LLC member with a put option–the right to sell his interest back to the LLC–exercise that option when doing so will render the LLC insolvent? This week’s New York Business Divorce post highlights a recent decision by Justice Masley of the New York County Commercial Division considering this issue.
Continue Reading Departing LLC Members: Exercise Your Put Option Before Insolvency Approaches

This week’s New York Business Divorce, authored by Peter J. Sluka, looks at a first-impression decision by the Delaware Chancery Court in which the court characterized a shareholder buy-out provision as a call option, with consequences for the company’s attempt to revoke its initiation of the buy-out.
Continue Reading Consider Whether Your Buy-Sell Provision is a Call Option Before Pulling the Trigger

A ministerial failure to replace the registered agent of a Delaware LLC ultimately started a chain of events leading to the dismissal last month by a New York appellate court of a direct action by the LLC against its former managers. Get the full story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Unauthorized Certificate of Revival Dooms Delaware LLC’s Claims Against Former Managing Members