The intensely personal dynamic of a family business divorce can lead to a multitude of applications to the court for interim relief in an effort to gain the higher ground financially and psychologically. This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights a case in which Justice Emily Pines addressed dueling motions by step-siblings for interim, mandatory injunctions in a battle for control of their late father’s auto dealerships.
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Justice Emily Pines’ decision last month in Matter of Bianchi, dismissing for lack of subject matter jurisdiction a petition to dissolve a New York-based Delaware corporation, raises anew the conflicting decisions on the issue among New York’s several Appellate Divisions. This week’s New York Business Divorce has the story.
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Pastrami, corned beef, and valuation were on the menu in Ruggiero v. Ruggiero, decided last month by Justice Emily Pines in a case pitting the widow of one brother against the surviving brother in a contested buy-out of shares in a kosher deli business. This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights the court’s discussion of the conflicting expert business appraisals.
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As New York’s Suffolk County continues to grow its population and economy, so too grows the volume and complexity of business litigation in the courts of Suffolk County Supreme Court. This week’s New York Business Divorce focuses on the Suffolk County Commercial Division, with a sampling of three recent decisions of interest by Justices Emerson, Pines and Whelan involving shareholder disputes.
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In prior litigation with his ex-wife, Gary Rubio swore he sold his shares in the family business to his father. When he brought a subsequent shareholder derivative action against his brother, he swore he didn’t, and proffered a company tax return to prove it. What’s a judge to do? Find out in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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In an unusual corporate dissolution case involving 50/50 shareholders decided last month by Justice Emily Pines, the court compelled a buyout of the petitioner’s shares by the other shareholder notwithstanding the latter’s consent to dissolution. Get the full story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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The doctrine of “unclean hands” played a decisive role in a recent decision by Justice Emily Pines in Kimelstein v. Kimelstein, in which the court dismissed a dissolution petition brought by someone who admitted that he never formalized his stock interest to keep it hidden from his ex-wives and the government. It’s in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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This week’s New York Business Divorce examines a fascinating post-trial decision last month by Justice Emily Pines in which the court resolved competing claims by a medical practice and one of its members who was expelled in the aftermath of a contentious acquisition of an ambulatory surgery center. You won’t want to miss it.

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