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In this week’s New York Business Divorce, read about a brand new decision considering the correct interpretation of a rarely-litigated statute: Section 1006 of the Limited Liability Company Law authorizing partnership to LLC conversions. The decision provides transactional lawyers useful guidance to structure such a reorganization to potentially avoid a limited partner’s right to dissent from the transaction and seek fair value in an appraisal proceeding.
Continue Reading A Fresh Take on Partnership to LLC Conversions

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, read about the outcomes of two pre-answer dismissal motions in parallel lawsuits commenced by the founding shareholder of a family-owned corporation challenging a cash-out merger initiated against him by the second-generation owners, including his cousins and nephew.
Continue Reading Questions Abound in Parallel Cash-Out Merger Rescission / Fair Value Appraisal Lawsuits

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, the sequel to an article about an earlier decision in the same case, read about a trio of decisions issued in rapid succession against a widow who claimed to have become shareholder of a corporation through a testamentary bequest that violated a shareholders’ agreement prohibiting stock transfers except to the shareholders’ “issue” or upon “unanimous consent” of all shareholders.
Continue Reading Three Strikes You’re Out: Sebrow Revisited

They say revenge is a dish best served cold. In this week’s New York Business Divorce, celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay serves his former business partner a cold dish in the form of a large post-trial judgment in a case seeking dissolution and derivative damages on behalf of two out-of-state entities formed to operate defunct Ramsay restaurant “The Fat Cow.”
Continue Reading Gordon Ramsay’s The Fat Cow: Dishing Up Damages and Dissolution

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, read about the history and development of case law in New York over the past 25 years holding potentially void as against public policy provisions in partnership, shareholders, and operating agreements barring closely-held business owners from petitioning courts to dissolve the entity.
Continue Reading Anti-Dissolution Provisions and Public Policy

This week’s New York Business Divorce involves an unusual procedural motion by a plaintiff to convert its lawsuit from a plenary action to a special proceeding under Section 1008 of the Business Corporation Law to adjudicate an individual’s shareholder’s liability for the corporation’s alleged breaches of contract and torts. May plaintiffs use BCL 1008 as an alternative to a veil piercing claim? Can corporate creditors use BCL 1008 to intervene in a judicial dissolution proceeding? Learn the answers in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Defendant Dissolves Mid-Lawsuit: What’s the Creditor’s Remedy?