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Man marries and has a daughter. He executes an operating agreement providing for his wife and daughter to take his LLC interest upon death. But the man has an alleged mistress, who allegedly begets a daughter out of wedlock. The man then executes a will providing for his alleged mistress and out-of-wedlock daughter to take his LLC interest upon death, contrary to the operating agreement. What could go wrong? You can read about this steamy litigation in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading How to Resolve Competing Estate Plans of an LLC Owner with a Double Life

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we consider a remarkably thoughtful opinion by Commercial Division Justice Jennifer G. Schecter containing some noteworthy hints about the future of LLC dissolution claims in light of the coronavirus pandemic and its catastrophic economic impact on New York closely-held businesses.
Continue Reading Will the Pandemic Be a Boon for Future LLC Dissolution Claimants?

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we consider a thoughtful decision from Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Andrea J. Masley about the rules for pleading pre-suit demand or demand futility upon a “liquidator” appointed to wind up the affairs of the corporation, including the rarely-litigated concept that allegations of pre-suit demand or demand futility can potentially “relate back” to a prior pleading that is “validly in litigation.”
Continue Reading The Pre-Suit Demand Requirement for a Corporation in Liquidation or Receivership

Can a shareholder petitioning for dissolution under Section 1104-a of the Business Corporation Law rely upon the “surcharge” provision of the statute to sue a non-shareholder, director, or officer for corporate misappropriation as an end-run around legal obstacles to an otherwise viable substative cause of action? We tackle that issue in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Who Is a “Control” Person for Purposes of the Dissolution Statute’s Surcharge Provision?

Typically used to seek a money judgment against a successor entity, in this week’s New York Business Divorce, read about a novel appellate decision relying upon the “de facto merger” doctrine to authorize a post-judgment equitable accounting against a successor entity in which the plaintiff admittedly lacked an ownership interest or fiduciary relationship.
Continue Reading Bending the Rules of Standing: The De Facto Merger Doctrine

Under what circumstances, if at all, does resignation of one member of a two-member board of directors eliminate “deadlock” and “internal dissention” as an available grounds for corporate judicial dissolution? In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we consider a recent ruling by Justice Andrea Masley on that important question.
Continue Reading Resignation: Antidote for Internal Dissention and Deadlock?

New York law imposes some strict limits on the ability of closely-held business owners and fiduciaries to recover advancement and indemnification of their legal fees from the entity in defense of derivative actions and other business divorce disputes. When advancement rights are abused, there are ways for minority owners to fight back. Read on in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Can the Company Pay My Legal Fees? – Part Two

Law firms see more than their fair share of business divorce litigation. But what are the chances of lightning striking twice? In this week’s New York Business Divorce, read about a fascinating, post-trial decision in which an upstate law firm endured a bitter partnership breakup for the second time in a decade, with the same partner taking the opposite position in each lawsuit.
Continue Reading Lawyer Says, “I’m Not a Partner, No Wait, I am a Partner!” Which is It?