limited partnershipNotwithstanding the ascendency of the limited liability company, the Delaware limited partnership continues to serve as an important, tax-advantaged vehicle for certain capital-intensive ventures — especially in the energy sector — featuring centralized management and limited liability for large numbers of passive investors.

Late last month, the Delaware Supreme Court handed down two noteworthy decisions springing from suits by limited partners challenging the fairness of conflicted transactions by general partners that were approved by conflicts committees. In one, the high court affirmed Chancery Court’s order rejecting a claim based on the implied duty of good faith and fair dealing where the transaction’s approval by the conflicts committee complied with the agreement’s safe harbor provision and thus contractually precluded judicial review. Employees Retirement System v TC Pipelines GP, Inc., No. 291, 2016 [Del. Sup. Ct. Dec. 19, 2016].

In the other, Supreme Court reversed Chancery Court’s post-trial decision holding the general partner liable in damages owed directly to limited partners for a conflicted, over-priced  “dropdown” transaction by the general partner. The high court disagreed with Chancery Court’s application of the Tooley standard, instead finding that the claims were exclusively derivative and that the post-trial, pre-judgment acquisition by merger of the partnership extinguished the plaintiff limited partner’s standing to seek relief. El Paso Pipeline GP Company, LLC v Brinckerhoff, No. 103, 2016 [Del. Sup. Ct. Dec. 20, 2016].

Together, the two decisions re-affirm the primacy of contract in the realm of alternative entities including limited liability companies, limited partnerships, and master limited partnerships. Continue Reading Limited Partners Take a Licking in Two Delaware Supreme Court Decisions

What are the current, hot topics in the law of business divorce? I’ve been thinking about this in preparation for a speaking engagement later this month, and thought I’d preview my choices for the hot-topic list in the hope that some interested readers might offer their own ideas about unsettled areas of the law governing dissolution cases and other types of disputes among co-owners of closely held business entities.

Not surprisingly, a majority of the topics I’ve come up with concern limited liability companies, which first came into being in New York in 1994. Case law applying the LLC Law got off to a tepid start — it wasn’t until 2010 that an appellate court authoritatively construed LLC Law § 702 governing judicial dissolution — but the pace of court decisions concerning LLCs has quickened in recent years as the LLC slowly but surely has supplanted the traditional business corporation as the preferred form of entity for privately-owned companies.

So, without further ado, here’s my list of hot topics in business divorce:

Equitable Buy-Out in LLC Dissolution Cases.  In contrast to oppressed minority shareholder dissolution petitions involving closely-held corporations (see Business Corporation Law § 1118), the LLC Law has no provision authorizing courts to compel a buy-out of the complaining or respondent LLC members as a remedy in judicial dissolution cases brought under LLC Law § 702. There nonetheless have been several appellate decisions affirming or ordering a compulsory buyout as an “equitable” remedy, of which the most notable is the Second Department’s 2013 ruling in Mizrahi v. Cohen where the court compelled a buy-out requested by the petitioner of the respondent member’s 50% interest. These few cases, each involving their own, peculiar set of facts, provide little guidance as to the circumstances under which courts will or won’t grant an equitable buy-out, or as to the interplay between equitable buy-out and LLC agreements that may limit dissolution remedies. It also remains to be seen whether buy-out awards in LLC cases will be based on the fair value standard used in statutory buy-outs of oppressed minority shareholders. Continue Reading Hot Topics in Business Divorce