shareholder oppression

A shareholder dispute spanning seven years of litigation in New York and Delaware came to an end last week with the latter state’s highest court’s refusal to rehear the case. This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights two of the many issues raised along the way: whether Delaware law recognizes a common-law claim for minority shareholder oppression, and the validity of a reverse stock split and cash-out of the minority shareholder that deprived her of standing to pursue derivative claims.
Continue Reading Business Divorce Case Reaches End of Long and Winding Road

Do majority shareholders of a close corporation owe a fiduciary duty to a minority shareholder to make accurate financial disclosures to enable fair valuation of the latter’s shares for purposes of a voluntary buy-out? Find out in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Blurring the Lines Between Oppression, Duty of Disclosure, and Fiduciary Breach

Tom Rutledge, one of the country’s leading lawyers and commentators on business organizations, recently published a fascinating article on minority shareholder oppression in which he challenges whether courts ought to provide remedies for terminated at-will employees who also happen to be minority shareholders. Read about it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading You’re Fired! No, I’m Oppressed!

A must-read decision last week by Justice Elizabeth Emerson in Federico v Brancato highlights the unique attributes and challenges of resolving conflicts within family-owned businesses. You won’t want to miss it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading When Parents Have to Choose: Succession Planning and the Family-Owned Business

A recent decision by Justice Marcy Friedman draws attention to a somewhat rare breed of minority shareholder oppression involving the controlling shareholder’s repudiation of the petitioner’s stock ownership. It’s a case you won’t want to miss, in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Is Denial of Shareholder Status Shareholder Oppression?

This week’s New York Business Divorce continues with Part Two of my interview with law professor and legal scholar Benjamin Means whose latest article applies legal and social science theories to the special problems afflicting the family owned business.
Continue Reading Interview with Law Professor Benjamin Means on Conflict in Family-Owned Businesses: Part Two

This week’s New York Business Divorce features Part One of a two-part online interview with law professor Benjamin Means, who has written a number of scholarly articles on shareholder oppression, and whose most recent article, called Non-Market Values in Family Businesses, applies Ben’s critical analysis to the special considerations attendant to oppression actions and conflict resolution within family-owned businesses. You won’t want to miss it!
Continue Reading Interview with Law Professor Benjamin Means on Conflict in Family-Owned Businesses: Part One

Must a corporate dissolution petition name all shareholders as respondents? Does the dismissal of a shareholder’s prior lawsuit asserting derivative and employment-based claims preclude his seeking relief as an oppressed minority shareholder? These are the questions answered in a recent decision by Justice Orin Kitzes in Matter of Adelstein (Finest Foods Distributing Co.), featured in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

Continue Reading Court Addresses Necessary Party, Res Judicata Issues in Shareholder Oppression Case Pitting Uncle Against Nephews