Stock Transfer Restrictions

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we tackle two important legal issues for LLC owners. First, the circumstances in which an upon-death membership interest transfer provision in an unsigned, non-final operating agreement may be enforced. Second, whether a membership interest transfer provision in an operating agreement trumps a conflicting bequest in a last will and testament.
Continue Reading Unsigned, Non-Final Operating Agreement Trumps Conflicting Testamentary Bequest of LLC Interest

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we discuss a recent decision serving as a reminder to corporate shareholders planning to bequeath their shares of stock to ensure no contracts prohibit them from doing so, lest they leave behind a very disappointed beneficiary.
Continue Reading When Estate Plans and Stock Transfer Restrictions Collide

It’s time for another cross-country trip in this week’s New York Business Divorce which summarizes a quintet of recent appellate decisions in business divorce cases by courts outside New York.
Continue Reading Business Divorce Nation: A Cross-Country Tour of Recent Decisions of Interest

The typical dispute among LLC members over membership interest transfers involves voluntary assignments or testamentary dispositions. This week’s New York Business Divorce looks at a pair of cases involving disputes arising from involuntary transfers of membership interests.
Continue Reading Turmoil Follows Involuntary Transfers of LLC Membership Interests

The Appellate Division, Second Department’s ruling last month in Berhend v. New Windsor Group, LLC illustrates the disastrous results when care is not taken by the assignee of an LLC interest to determine the validity of the assignor’s interest and the existence of transfer restrictions in the LLC’s operating agreement. Get the full story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Always Check Provenance Before Taking an Assignment of LLC Interest

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, a tip of the hat to retiring Justices Eileen Bransten and Charles E. Ramos with a look back at some of their more memorable business divorce rulings.
Continue Reading A Fond Adieu to Two Giants of the Manhattan Commercial Division Bench

In a rare dissolution decision from the New York Surrogate’s Court – a court for the affairs of the deceased – the court declines to kill off a clothing business based upon a claim of oppression brought by the estate of the former minority shareholder. Read about it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Surrogate’s Court Declines to Order Demise of Fashion Business

The LLC freeze-out merger has been referred to by one scholar as “hidden statutory expulsion.” In a decision last month featured in this week’s New York Business Divorce, Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Charles Ramos refused to enjoin a freeze-out merger challenged by minority members of an LLC who claimed that it violated the LLC’s operating agreement.
Continue Reading Court Finds No Breach of Operating Agreement, No Basis to Enjoin LLC Freeze-Out Merger

Stock transfer restrictions in closely held corporations are routinely upheld by courts. So are increases in authorized shares that treat existing shareholders uniformly. But sometimes, as in the case highlighted in this week’s New York Business Divorce, the combined effect of the two may breach duties owed by controllers to the minority.
Continue Reading Too Clever By Half? Court Permits Suit Challenging Share Increase Tied to Transfer Restrictions