A Manhattan panel of appellate judges last month enforced an LLC operating agreement’s provision giving the manager sole discretion — even at his “whimsy” or “impetuously” said the court — to determine a member’s sharing ratio of the firm’s profits. It’s worth reading in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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Equitable remedy trumps pick-your-partner, is one way to describe the outcome in Garber v. Stevens, decided last month by Justice Eileen Bransten, who granted a motion by limited partners to remove the wrongdoing general partners of a real estate limited partnership and replace them with an LLC wholly owned by the limited partners. Read more about this unusual case in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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This week’s New York Business Divorce examines a fascinating post-trial decision last month by Justice Emily Pines in which the court resolved competing claims by a medical practice and one of its members who was expelled in the aftermath of a contentious acquisition of an ambulatory surgery center. You won’t want to miss it.

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A decision last week by the Appellate Division, First Department, in Lehey v. Goldburt brings to light a bitter dispute between the managing member of a vodka distributor with a gimmicky bottle featuring an LED ticker display, and an investor claiming that his millions in funding have been squandered. Get the story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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The expulsion of an LLC member for breach of the LLC agreement, when combined with buyout provisions that leave the expelled member with little or no return on investment, is a sure-fire recipe for litigation, as evidenced in a recent decision by Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Melvin Schweitzer in Jain v. Rasteh. Read about it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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A divided panel of the Appellate Division, First Department last week upheld the removal of an LLC member-manager by majority vote of the members, notwithstanding a provision in the operating agreement requiring all members to vote for the ousted manager in any election. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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