The lesson of the case highlighted in this week’s New York Business Divorce is simple: Don’t file for dissolution under the shareholder oppression and looting statute unless you’re prepared for the opposing shareholders to elect to purchase your shares for fair value, because you may not be able to walk it back.
Continue Reading

Remember Gilbert v Weintraub, the case of the LLC member who resigned as manager and started a competing company? A new decision by Justice Timothy Driscoll sheds more light on the question whether a member-manager can shed fiduciary duty.
Continue Reading

This week’s New York Business Divorce closes out the year with an interesting decision by Justice Timothy Driscoll dismissing a dissolution petition that followed the sale of an LLC’s sole real estate asset based on the broad purpose clause in the parties’ LLC agreement..
Continue Reading

A case decided last month by Justice Timothy Driscoll in Gilbert v Weintraub raises but doesn’t answer the tantalizing question whether a member of a multi-member, member-managed LLC with no operating agreement can shed fiduciary obligations and freely start a competing business by disavowing any management role in the prior business. This week’s New York Business Divorce has the story.
Continue Reading

In the face of Second Department case law rejecting subject-matter jurisdiction over statutory dissolution claims involving foreign business entities, the plaintiffs in Bonavita v Savenergy, Inc. argued to Justice Timothy Driscoll that he nonetheless could hear a claim for common-law dissolution of a Delaware corporation. Did they succeed? Find out in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading

After years of litigation and a lengthy trial, earlier this month Justice Timothy Driscoll released his decision fixing the fair value of the petitioning 50% shareholder’s interest in the AriZona Iced Tea companies. You won’t want to miss it in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading

Insurance-funded buy-sell agreements among owners of closely held companies, when done right, provide financial security for the family of a deceased owner and continuity for the surviving owners. When done wrong, well, that’s another story, as illustrated in a case recently decided by Justice Timothy Driscoll highlighted in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading