In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we salute recently-retired Commercial Division Justice Shirley Werner Kornreich with a collection of some of her most noteworthy decisions in the area of business ownership disputes.
Continue Reading A Trip Down Business Divorce Lane with Recently Retired Justice Shirley Werner Kornreich

Is there a meaningful difference between the deadlock standard for judicial dissolution under the Partnership Law and the Business Corporation Law? Perhaps. Read on in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Rare Partnership Dissolution Decision Applies Deadlock Standard to Dissolution Under Partnership Law

After more than two years in receivership, an appeals court gives a dissolved LLC a new lease on life because the petitioners “offered no competent evidentiary proof” why the entity should have been dissolved. We take a closer look in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading “Where’s the Beef?” Says Appeals Court, Reversing LLC Dissolution

This week’s New York Business Divorce authored by Frank McRoberts focuses on a relatively rare issue decided by Albany Commercial Division Justice Richard Platkin involving a dissolution petitioner’s request for permission to withdraw the dissolution claim in order to defeat the majority’s buy-out election.
Continue Reading Withdraw a Dissolution Claim? Not So Fast

New York’s highest court last week agreed to hear an appeal in a case that raises important issues concerning wrongful dissolution, damages, and valuation discounts under New York’s partnership law. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Court of Appeals to Decide Controversial Partnership Dissolution Case

The lesson of the case highlighted in this week’s New York Business Divorce is simple: Don’t file for dissolution under the shareholder oppression and looting statute unless you’re prepared for the opposing shareholders to elect to purchase your shares for fair value, because you may not be able to walk it back.
Continue Reading Once Opened, The Door to Judicial Dissolution and Buy-Out Is Hard to Close