Those interested in the evolving law of LLC dissolution won’t want to miss this week’s New York Business Divorce featuring a case called Mizrahi v. Cohen decided last week by Justice Carolyn Demarest in which she ordered dissolution of a financially failing real estate holding company.

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With about 1,300 pizzerias in New York City, it’s inevitable that some of them wind up the subject of involuntary corporate dissolution proceedings, such as the one recently decided by Nassau Commercial Division Justice Ira Warshawsky in Matter of DiMaria involving a petition brought by a minority owner alleging shareholder oppression and majority owners counter-alleging that the petitioner himself engaged in wrongful conduct. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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A decision last week by the Appellate Division, First Department, in Lehey v. Goldburt brings to light a bitter dispute between the managing member of a vodka distributor with a gimmicky bottle featuring an LED ticker display, and an investor claiming that his millions in funding have been squandered. Get the story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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Under the Business Corporation Law, must a court-appointed receiver sell at public auction realty owned by a dissolved corporation, or may the receiver offer the property in a privately negotiated sale? That’s the question presented in Matter of Darvish decided this month by Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Melvin Schweitzer. It’s in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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A Queens County judge recently lowered the boom on controlling shareholders of a fire and burglar alarm company, all of whose assets they sold without telling, or distributing any sale proceeds to, a minority shareholder. Get the full story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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When the court appoints a receiver in a corporate dissolution proceeding, must a shareholder who thereafter seeks to bring a derivative action on the corporation’s behalf make a formal demand upon the receiver before filing the action? A recent decision by Nassau County Commercial Division Justice Timothy S. Driscoll, covered in this week’s New York Business Divorce, gives the answer.

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A recent decision by Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Melvin Schweitzer in a corporate dissolution case called Matter of Darvish breaks new ground with respect to the disproportionate assessment against the shareholders’ distributive shares of a court-appointed receiver’s legal fees. It’s in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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