Derivative actions brought by LLC members take the spotlight for the second week in a row, this time featuring a pair of noteworthy decisions involving Delaware and Nevada LLCs in which the defendants argued that the plaintiff’s right to sue derivatively was waived by the operating agreement. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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Is the contractual freedom associated with LLC statutory default rules being used to promote efficiencies or opportunistically by LLC controllers at the expense of vulnerable LLC members? That’s the subject of a study and article by Professor Peter Molk highlighted in this week’s New York Business Divorce and accompanying interview of Professor Molk on the Business Divorce Roundtable podcast.
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A very interesting decision earlier this month by Justice Eileen Bransten in Doppelt v. Smith addressed whether a minority limited partner’s right to seek judicial dissolution was preempted by the partnership agreement’s provision authorizing dissolution upon the consent of a majority of the limited partnership interests. Read more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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Delaware law’s contractarian approach is central to that state’s jurisprudence concerning limited liability companies. Last month, in Huatuco v. Satellite Healthcare, the Court of Chancery cited freedom-of-contract in dismissing an action for judicial dissolution based on its finding that the LLC agreement’s provision, limiting member rights to those expressly granted in the agreement, constituted a waiver of the right to seek judicial dissolution. This week’s New York Business Divorce asks the question, does Huatuco take contractarianism too far?
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A recent decision by Westchester Commercial Division Justice Alan D. Scheinkman in Briarcliff Solutions Holdings, LLC v. Fifth Third Bank (Chicago) takes the spotlight in this week’s New York Business Divorce, featuring a battle for control of the company’s Board of Directors and, ultimately, control of a lawsuit asserting claims against one ownership faction. Don’t miss it.
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Last week, in Pappas v. Tzolis, the Appellate Division, First Department, handed down a 3-2 decision reinstating claims for fiduciary breach and fraud brought by members of an LLC against another member who acquired their interests allegedly while keeping secret his negotiations to sell the LLC’s sole asset to an outside buyer at a drastically higher valuation. It’s an important decision likely headed to the New York Court of Appeals, and it’s in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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