The statute governing LLC mergers requires a member vote at a meeting to be held on at least 20 days notice. In Slayton v. Highline Stages, LLC, the majority members used written consents in lieu of a meeting to approve a freeze-out merger, which the frozen-out minority member challenged. Did she succeed? Find out in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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This week’s New York Business Divorce presents the first of a two-part examination of Justice Shirley Kornreich’s must-read decision in Zelouf International v. Zelouf, a dissenting shareholder appraisal proceeding in which the court rejected application of a marketability discount.
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Decisions in lawsuits brought by minority members challenging LLC mergers are rare finds. This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights a recent decision in just such a case by Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Melvin Schweitzer, in which he denied a motion to dismiss an action seeking to set aside a merger involving a realty management company organized as a three-member LLC. You won’t want to miss it.
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A shareholder’s derivative action alleging misappropriation and waste by the controlling shareholders, filed in 2009, was scheduled for trial earlier this month. About three weeks before trial, the controlling shareholders initiated a freeze-out merger for the specific purpose of defeating the suing shareholder’s standing to maintain the action. Did it work? Find out in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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Freeze-out mergers are well known in the corporate venue, but did you know they can also be used for limited liability companies, and that they can trigger appraisal rights? This week’s New York Business Divorce examines a decision by Manhattan Commercial Division Justice Charles Ramos in a rare lawsuit prompted by an LLC freeze-out merger.

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Stock valuation junkies can get their fix in this week’s New York Business Divorce, as it revisits the issue of discounts for BIG — as in built-in capital gains taxes — in the appraisal of C corporation shares under the fair value standard, prompted by a decision last week by a Manhattan appeals court in a case called Matter of Mandelbaum.

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This week’s New York Business Divorce highlights a recent decision dismissing a complaint by a former shareholder, brought after he already won a judgment in a dissenting shareholder stock appraisal, seeking to compel the company to pay him additional “tax dividend” distributions.

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