Over the last several years, the books-and-records proceeding and its corresponding shareholder rights of inspection seem to have entered a bit of renaissance period in the courts. We here at New York Business Divorce have reported on at least nine decisions primarily addressing the topic since September 2014, going on record to proclaim the phenomenon as a “boost” for the summary proceeding, by which minority owners in closely-held businesses can get a window into the management and operation of the companies from which they’ve been shut out. We’ve even gone so far as to suggest that books-and-records proceedings may be “on a roll” of late, both in terms of an expansion what constitutes a “proper purpose” for bringing the proceeding, as well as in terms of the scope of information attainable.

That trend, at least with respect to the frequency with which issues related to inspection rights are being litigated, appears to be continuing into 2018. What follows are summaries of three of this year’s more notable decisions addressing inspection rights – all from Manhattan Supreme Court, as it happens.

But first, a quick refresher on the subject matter at hand… Continue Reading Inspection Rights, Oral Operating Agreements, and Other Pop-Diva Delights

The sudden death of Alexander Calderwood, the brilliant but troubled co-founder of the Ace brand of hotels, resulted in some fierce litigation between Calderwood’s estate and Calderwood’s LLC co-member over the nature of his estate’s membership interest in the company after his death. The litigation came to a head earlier this month, when Justice Barbara R. Kapnick issued a scholarly decision for a unanimous panel of the Appellate Division, First Department in Estate of Calderwood v ACE Group Int’l, LLC, 2017 NY Slip Op 08750 [1st Dept Dec. 14, 2017].

Boiled down, the question on appeal was whether, under Delaware law, Calderwood’s estate was a bona fide member of the LLC with all of a member’s associated rights and privileges, or instead, a mere assignee of Calderwood’s membership interest. As written about in a post last Spring (read here), New York County Commercial Division Justice Shirley Werner Kornreich issued a decision dismissing most of the Estate’s amended complaint, holding that the Estate lacked membership status in the LLC upon Calderwood’s death. Let’s see how the appeals court considered the issue. Continue Reading Delaware Contractarian Principles Prevail in Appeal Over Deceased Ace Hotel Founder’s LLC Interest

shutterstock_121625548It’s not that I get nostalgic about derivative lawsuits (or Oldsmobiles), it’s just that it feels like we’re in a brave new world when it comes to adapting hoary corporate doctrine to that unincorporated upstart known as the limited liability company.

The clash between old and new looms in a derivative action concerning an LLC pending before Erie County Commercial Division Presiding Justice Timothy J. Walker called Univest I Corp. v Skydeck Corp., Index No. 2014-811644. The case stems from a dispute between the 50% managing member (BDC) and 50% non-managing member (Univest) of 470 Pearl Street, LLC, which was formed in 2004 for the purpose of acquiring for future development a parking lot in Buffalo, New York. Pending the development, BDC and Univest agreed to lease the parking lot to a BDC affiliate known as Skydeck Corp. The lease granted 470 Pearl the right to terminate the lease on 60-days notice.

In 2014, Univest, acting in 470 Pearl’s name, issued a termination notice to Skydeck under authority of an unusual provision in 470 Pearl’s operating agreement that gave either member the unilateral right “to cause 470 Pearl to terminate” the Skydeck lease. Two lawsuits followed Skydeck’s refusal to vacate. In the first, Justice Walker granted Univest a declaratory judgment upholding its termination notice and ordering Skydeck, pending further order, to pay an increased monthly rent (read amended complaint here and the court’s order here).

Shortly afterward, Univest commenced a derivative summary eviction proceeding on behalf of 470 Pearl, naming both Skydeck and BDC as respondents (read petition here). Now, let me pause the story for a moment. I’m not a landlord-tenant lawyer. If you’d asked me, before I looked into the Univest case, whether a non-controlling, non-managing corporation shareholder or LLC member could bring an eviction proceeding against the corporation’s or LLC’s tenant, I’m sure I would have guessed “no” for at least two reasons. First, I would have assumed the governing statute in Article 7 of the Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law somehow limits standing to seek relief to the owner or its authorized agent. Second, evicting a third-party tenant strikes me as quintessential management action. Imagine the chaos if any minority owner of a real estate operating company could take it upon themselves to launch eviction proceedings. But I would have guessed wrong. Gorbrook Associates, Inc. v Silverstein, 40 Misc 3d 425 [Dist. Ct. Nassau County 2013], a case of apparent first impression, held that a non-controlling, minority shareholder may bring derivatively an eviction proceeding.  Continue Reading Not Your Father’s Derivative Action