Special Purpose Acquisition Companies or “SPACs” have become all the rage over the last two years, so it was inevitable that we’d see litigation between members of the LLCs that serve as SPAC sponsors. This week’s New York Business Divorce looks at a case stemming from a dispute over whether the sponsor’s operating agreement gave members an ongoing right to participate in future SPACs.
Continue Reading It Was Only a Matter of Time: SPAC Meets Business Divorce

A decision last week by the Appellate Division, First Department, highlights the relatively precarious position of LLC minority members versus minority shareholders of close corporations when it comes to seeking remedies for alleged abuse by the LLC’s controlling member. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading The Money’s There But Out of Reach for the Minority LLC Member

In this week’s New York Business Divorce, we tackle two important legal issues for LLC owners. First, the circumstances in which an upon-death membership interest transfer provision in an unsigned, non-final operating agreement may be enforced. Second, whether a membership interest transfer provision in an operating agreement trumps a conflicting bequest in a last will and testament.
Continue Reading Unsigned, Non-Final Operating Agreement Trumps Conflicting Testamentary Bequest of LLC Interest

This week’s New York Business Divorce offers its annual Winter Case Notes with synopses of four noteworthy decisions by courts in New York and Iowa.
Continue Reading Winter Case Notes: Dissolution of Not-For-Profit Corporation and Other Decisions of Interest

The interaction between an LLC’s operating agreement and a subsequent, informal deal between the members raises difficult questions surrounding the enforceability of either agreement. In a recently-filed Manhattan Commercial Division case, the Court granted the plaintiff a preliminary injunction, signaling to the parties that the plaintiff was likely to succeed on his claim to enforce the informal deal notwithstanding arguably contrary provisions in the operating agreement. The case reminds us that the formality requirements of an LLC operating agreement may give way to an informal agreement when both LLC members manifest their intent to be bound by the informal agreement.
Continue Reading A Shotgun Buy-Sell Agreement and an Email Deal Walk into a Beachside Bar . . .

Defying my recent lamentation on the dearth of cases involving buy-out disputes where the buyer doesn’t disclose to the seller an outside offer for the entity’s assets at a much higher value, this week’s New York Business Divorce examines yet another such case with some interesting twists on the usual fact pattern.
Continue Reading Re-Revisiting The Duty to Disclose Third-Party Offers Amidst Buy-Out Negotiations

This week’s New York Business Divorce is a follow-up to last week’s article, a piece about the enormously important appellate decision in the Farro case, the first to carefully consider the correct meaning and interpretation of New York’s LLC merger statute and its relation to the analogous corporation merger statute. In this week’s article, learn about the rest of the story in the Farro litigation, addressed in two companion appellate decisions issued the same day.
Continue Reading The Farro Litigation: The Rest of the Story

In a long-awaited decision handed down last week by the Appellate Division, Second Department, the court construed two sections of New York’s LLC Law in a significant boost to the ability of members with voting control to remove minority members by means of a cash-out merger. Learn more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
Continue Reading Groundbreaking Appellate Ruling Boosts LLC Cash-Out Mergers