“Yet another unfortunate example of a family business dispute that has developed into needless litigation” is how Justice Shirley Kornreich describes a partnership dispute pitting daughter against father and sisters. Get the story in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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A very interesting decision earlier this month by Justice Eileen Bransten in Doppelt v. Smith addressed whether a minority limited partner’s right to seek judicial dissolution was preempted by the partnership agreement’s provision authorizing dissolution upon the consent of a majority of the limited partnership interests. Read more in this week’s New York Business Divorce.
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shortsTraditions are good. This blog has two annual traditions. First, at the end of each year I write a post listing the year’s top ten business divorce decisions. Second, each August I offer readers who are (or ought to be) on summer vacation some light reading in the form of three, relatively short case summaries.

So here we are in what’s been a particularly felicitous August weather-wise (at least here in the Northeast U.S.), with another edition of Summer Shorts. This edition’s summaries feature two out-of-state cases — one from Florida involving expulsion of an LLC member and one from Delaware involving the valuation upon redemption of an LLC member’s interest — and a New York appellate court decision involving the removal of a limited partnership’s general partner.

The Anti-Chiu: Florida Court Upholds LLC Member’s Expulsion

Froonjian v Ultimate Combatant, LLC, No. 4D14-662 [Fla. Dist. Ct. App. May 27, 2015].  The Florida intermediate appellate court’s ruling in Froonjian makes for a fascinating contrast with New York case law represented most prominently by the Second Department’s 2010 decision in Chiu v Chiu holding that, absent express authorization in the LLC’s operating agreement, a member’s involuntary expulsion is not permitted. Going 180° in the other direction, the Froonjian court upheld the majority members’ expulsion of a minority member from a Florida LLC that had no operating agreement, reasoning that the Florida default statute vesting all decision-making authority in the members acting by majority vote encompasses the authority to expel a member.
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If until now you haven’t encountered a case involving the “equitable” dissolution of a partnership, join the club. Find out more in this week’s New York Business Divorce which highlights a recent decision by Justice Stephan Bucaria in a 10-year litigation among the general partners of several limited partnerships governed by the outmoded Uniform Limited Partnership Act.
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Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Saliann Scarpulla’s recent ruling in Poole v. West 111th Street Rehab Associates illustrates some of the difficult interpretive and factual issues that often accompany internal partnership disputes governed by the “old” Limited Partnership Act adopted by New York in 1922. This week’s New York Business Divorce explains.
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Do New York courts have authority to hear suits for judicial dissolution of New York-based foreign business entities? This week’s New York Business Divorce discusses a recent decision by Justice Anil C. Singh in Holdrum, N.V. v. Edelman, which highlights a split of appellate authority on the issue.
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Equitable remedy trumps pick-your-partner, is one way to describe the outcome in Garber v. Stevens, decided last month by Justice Eileen Bransten, who granted a motion by limited partners to remove the wrongdoing general partners of a real estate limited partnership and replace them with an LLC wholly owned by the limited partners. Read more about this unusual case in this week’s New York Business Divorce.

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